Journal

Large-Scale Canoeing Photograph

01.15.2015

canadian pacific photo french river

This is an historic photograph of a canoeist, probably an Ojibwe guide, who is navigating a rapids called Blue Chute on the French River in Ontario. It is housed in its original oak frame that is inscribed “Canadian Pacific” along the bottom. With overall dimensions of 35.5″ wide x 29.5″ high, it has an eye-catching presence.

Canadian Pacific Photo French River

There are several layers of history revealed in this circa 1910 photo. First, it is an artifact of the original era of passenger railway travel across Canada. Second, it captures a place, the French River, that was an important fur trade route. Finally, it conveys something about early 20th century canoeing traditions.

Canadian Pacific Railway

We contacted an archivist with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) who confirmed what we had learned through buying and selling several other CPR photos in the past. These large-format photographs captured iconic Canadian landscape scenes and were hung in CPR stations as “simple, yet stunning and effective, advertising tools for Canadian Pacific and Canada.” Aimed at attracting tourists from within and beyond Canada, the photos captured scenes closely tied to Canadian identity and its proud links to the incredible scenic beauty of the country. The CPR photographs could be found on display until the 1970s when all of the stations eventually closed.

Although we do not have photos of other CPR images we have owned, we do have images from our past inventory of a large-scale photograph from another railway system, the Grand Trunk Railway, which had a similar approach to promoting Canadian rail travel. The Grand Trunk was an important rail system in Canada and the northern U.S. from the 1850s to the 1920s.

Grand Trunk Railway photo

Grand Trunk Railway photo

This early 1900’s photo depicts a romantic scene of a well-dressed couple on an outing in which the man rows the woman who is nestled in the stern facing him. Its captions reads: “McLean Channel Among the 30,000 islands of the Georgian Bay.” Even the location of this particular photo, also in an inscribed oak frame, is not far from the subject of the CPR photo – the French River.

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