Journal

Early Canoe Club Sign

11.17.2015

Pequot Canoe Club sign
This circa 1890 sign is a cultural artifact of the historic and hugely appealing (to us and other canoe aficionados) craze for recreational canoeing that swept the nation from the late 1800s into the early decades of the 1900s. The evolution from birch bark to wood and canvas canoes around this time period made canoes more widely available, and canoeing as a sport among the middle and upper classes was born.

Whereas birch bark canoes were largely utilitarian crafts, wood and canvas canoes inspired more sporting and recreational uses. Canoe outings varied from leisurely or romantic paddling jaunts (as depicted on the circa 1910 embroidered pillow from our past inventory) to organized meets for athletic activities such as canoe racing and jousting (as shown in the circa 1920s photos from the Washington Canoe Club).

canoeing pillow

high kneel canoeing

(from washingtoncanoeclub.org)

canoe jousting

(from washingtoncanoeclub.org)

athletic canoe club members

(from washingtoncanoeclub.org)

 

This sign is a product of that era, and of the penchant for canoe enthusiasts to form regional clubs, in this case in southeastern Connecticut. It is a well-made, hefty, double-sided wooden sign (30” wide, 1.5” deep, 22” high) with shaped and chamfered edges and hand-forged hanging rings.

Pequot Canoe Clulb sign

The face of each side of the sign is covered in thick, sanded black paint. The front side has gold lettering with the translucent tone of gilding, while the lettering on the reverse side is in a flatter mustard gold paint. The lettering on each side has an excellent, aged-crazed surface.

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Pequot Canoe Clulb sign

Pequot canoe club sign

 

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Back of the sign with mustard gold lettering.

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This is a quality antique that meets the high standards for collectible folk art signs, but it is the history it evokes that gives it particular meaning within our specialty areas, including sporting art and artifacts (and in this case even with a Native American theme) hailing from the turn-of-the-20th-century rusticator era.

Broad Historical Context

This sign was made not long after the founding of the American Canoe Association (ACA) which occurred as the outcome of a meeting of 23 prominent men – all canoe enthusiasts – on Lake George in upstate New York in 1880. The ACA is still active today, making it “one of the oldest national sports governing bodies in North America” (NYSHA.org). Since its establishment, the ACA has held annual summer encampments or “meets” during which members camp out and participate in races and other events. Since 1903 the ACA meets have been held on its own Sugar Island in the 1000 Islands region of the St. Lawrence River.

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